GREEN It was originally thought that golf courses were part of the closures in Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine’s Stay at Home Order, but a statement released at the end of March from the Ohio Department of Health gave the go ahead for courses to open and remain open through the shutdown.


After some confusion over whether the opening of the courses was allowed and according to the North East Ohio Golf’s website, the Ohio Department of Health sent emails out to County Health Departments with a clarifying statement allowing courses to operate.


That has been good news to many golfers and golf course owners in the area including Mayfair Country Club, 2229 Raber Road, Green. Dave Springer and his wife, Jeannie, own the public course, which offers nine and 18 hole play.


“We’ve owned the course for 33 years,” Springer wrote in an email. “We have noticed an increase in the number of people wanting to play golf this spring already. Golfers can walk or drive the course. With social distancing rules, only one person can be in a cart at time, so we have had to block off half our tee times. Because of that, we are working at ways to double our cart fleet.”


Another rule golf courses have to adhere to is that there is no eating or drinking allowed in the clubhouse. Springer said players can purchase prepackaged food or drinks to take outside of the clubhouse. And, they are not allowed to serve mixed drinks for consumption inside or outside.


The course is open April through October.


“Mayfair isn’t a difficult course and it is enjoyable for the average player and many retirees play here. Golf is a good way for high school and college athletes to stay in shape for their fall programs especially since all of the gyms are closed,” Springer wrote.


According to an article on npr.org, the World Golf Foundation estimates that golfers who walk an 18-hole course will walk about five miles and burn up to 2,000 calories. Even those golfers using a cart to drive the course can burn up to 1,300 calories.


The same article reported that swinging the clubs uses a lot of muscles, plus there is a lot of balancing, turning and twisting the torso. And, there is a meditative aspect by being outside on the course.


“I think it is a great sport and some of the top professionals are great athletes these days,” Springer wrote.