Families and friends came together to enjoy the holiday spirit that permeated from the historic Quail Hollow State Park, where everything Christmas was happening.

Families and friends came together to enjoy the holiday spirit that permeated from the historic Quail Hollow State Park, where everything Christmas was happening.

The annual Christmas at the Hollow event took place over the course of three nights and each of the three evenings was filled with holiday events.

A tour of the 40-room historic house was on the agenda of the holiday spirit-seekers. Every room of the house, including its many bathrooms, was decorated. Rooms with trees and trains, others with reindeer, snowmen and the room where Santa had laid his red suit and boots out in anticipation of the big night.

Carols were being sung by local high school choirs and the bonfire was burning bright for toasting marshmallows. Wassail was on the menu as was hot chocolate and other good treats like milk and cookies, popcorn and hot pretzels.

Christmas at the Hollow is one of the few places to find the traditional Wassail, which is a hot spiced cider. The evening of Christmas fun included children's events like making ornaments to take home and wagon rides through the woods.

 The most popular man at this time of year was on hand to hear the wishes for him to bring down the chimney. There were wagon rides and shopping at the Quail's Nest gift shop.

Quail Hollow State Park employees and many members of the Quail Hollow State Park Volunteer Association have been providing the Christmas event for over 30 years. It takes a lot of people to make it all happen.

Traditionally families come back year after year. More than 1,900 people visit over the three day event.

The area known as Quail Hollow State Park was first home to Conrad Brumbaugh, the first permanent settler to the area, 1820. He built a home and began farming. It remained in the Brumbaugh family until 1914 when it was purchased by Harry Bartlett Stewart, chairman of the board for Akron, Canton and Youngstown Railroad, to be used as a hunting camp.

Eventually the home was expanded and became the permanent residence for his family and they called it the Minnie Taylor Farm named for Harry's wife, Minnie. He passed the farm onto his son, Harry Bartlett Stewart, Jr., and he continued to improve the buildings. He lived there until 1975 when it was sold to the state and it became Quail Hollow State Park May 15, 1975.

The home is currently used for educational and community activities. It is open for self-guided tours every Saturday and Sunday afternoon from May through October. The visitor center is in the home and areas of the house can be rented for small parties and meetings.  

Quail Hollow offers activities throughout the year. During the winter months the park is a wonderful winter land for cross country skiing or snowshoeing. A rental shop for equipment is located on the lower level of the Manor House. Hours and prices are available on the website www.quailhollowpark.net. or call for information 330-628-4720.

The park is located at 13480 Congress Lake Avenue, Hartville.