Why should Tebow’s tenure in New York be any different? Dealing for Tebow either becomes a masterstroke for the Jets, both on the field and off, or an unmitigated disaster that likely sinks the Rex Ryan regime.

The New York Jets don’t simply stir the pot. Led by head alchemist Rex Ryan, the Jets seem to relish tossing fresh, flashy ingredients into the mix every off-season.

Some of the additions have a tendency to be quite volatile, capable of blowing up on any given Sunday. Others fizzle out. The product that eventually bubbles to the surface on the gridiron has varied from very good to mediocre, but it’s always been entertaining from afar.

Like a movie producer looking to guarantee a big performance at the box office, the Jets have made a habit of acquiring high-profile talent in recent years, a list that includes Plaxico Burress, Santonio Holmes, Antonio Cromartie and LaDanian Tomlinson. Now, Rex Ryan and Co. is making its most daring gamble yet by bringing Tim Tebow to the biggest of stages.

Though the cost wasn’t exorbitant — just fourth- and sixth-round picks — the phenomenon that is Tebow Mania makes this an all-in move by the Jets brass. Tebow’s career to date has been a study in absolutes. One quarter, the completion of a simple five-yard curl route to an open receiver seems like a miracle. The next, Tebow is suddenly leading a miraculous comeback in the final two minutes of regulation.

Why should Tebow’s tenure in New York be any different? Dealing for Tebow either becomes a masterstroke for the Jets, both on the field and off, or an unmitigated disaster that likely sinks the Rex Ryan regime.

It’s difficult to picture a middle ground. Tebow’s role in the New York offense may be somewhat similar to that of former Jet and current Bill Brad Smith. Smith had a solid, if unremarkable season for Buffalo, converting some third downs out of the Wildcat early before injuries pressed him into duty as primarily a receiver.

That type of ho-hum, workmanlike season isn’t likely to fly for the Jets. At this point of his career, Tebow may be best suited to situational packages, entering the game in third-and-shorts, on the goal line, and as the occasional change of pace for a series or two each game. Tebow has already shown the ability to excel in such situations.

To New York’s credit, the early word out of the Big Apple indicates that is exactly how the Jets plan to use Tebow’s unique talents. New offensive coordinator Tony Sparano spearheaded the Wildcat frenzy of several seasons ago during his time in Miami. With a little creativity and a fresh approach to the scheme, Tebow could be the most devastating Wildcat “quarterback” the league has seen, a true dual run and pass threat that other Wildcat operators couldn’t match.

It’s a fine plan, if the player in question was anybody other than Tim Tebow. Tebow is bringing his own personal fan base with him to New York, not to mention a tsunami of attention and scrutiny that will only be amplified in the media capital of the world.

If Mark Sanchez and Jets struggle early in the season (maybe even in the first intersquad scrimmage), the calls for a quarterback change will begin quicker than you can say Tebow Time. Tebow isn’t one to foment such unrest, but the mere presence of his larger-than-life persona has a power all its own. Ask Kyle Orton what it’s like trying to lead an offense while Tebow is holding a clipboard on the sideline.

The Jets locker room was hardly a bastion of team unity and goodwill last season. Can it withstand a quarterback controversy? Cromartie has already questioned the trade on Twitter.

Jets legend Joe Namath went even further, calling the move a “publicity stunt” on 1050 ESPN Radio, adding, “I don’t think they know what they’re doing over there.”

New York is betting big that TT is a stable element.

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Chris Potter is a sports and outdoors writer at the Hornell Evening Tribune (N.Y.). He can be reached at chrispotter@eveningtribune.com