Up to half of all Americans have some sort of vein problem, with the majority of spider veins and varicose veins appearing in the legs. Dark, unsightly leg veins may be common, but that doesn’t make them any more appealing. If you’ve noticed that previously invisible veins are now as plain as day, take heart: There are options. Once you’ve discussed the issue with your doctor, consider the following to get your limbs looking lovely again.

 

Up to half of all Americans have some sort of vein problem, with the majority of spider veins and varicose veins appearing in the legs.

Dark, unsightly leg veins may be common, but that doesn’t make them any more appealing. If you’ve noticed that previously invisible veins are now as plain as day, take heart: There are options. Once you’ve discussed the issue with your doctor, consider the following to get your limbs looking lovely again.

Laser or other medical treatments

Since spider veins are considered a cosmetic problem, treatment is generally not covered by insurance. Costs vary depending on the extent of the problem and the type of treatment used, but plan to spend at least $200 to $400. Varicose veins — raised veins that you can feel — are sometimes considered a medical condition, and treatment may be covered.

Makeup

For a picture-perfect look for a special event, many upscale salons will airbrush your legs. This makeup, which will make your legs look flawless and should last all day, can cost $25 to $150. A highly recommended and affordable option for everyday use is Dermablend makeup (www.Dermablend.com). A 3.4-ounce tube of their Leg & Body Cover Foundation costs $26.

Hoosiery

Compression hosiery can help prevent veins from becoming more visible and can camouflage existing spider or varicose veins. There are many brands that cost less than $20. If you prefer to wear regular, flesh-toned pantyhose to help disguise leg veins, don’t worry too much about the new dictum that such hosiery is “out.” Just make sure the hose creates a reasonable color match with your overall skin tone, and check yourself in a mirror from all angles in natural light to be sure it’s actually working to hide the issue.

Sources: Mayo Clinic; U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; MacKenzie J. Ramirez of MJ Makeup Artistry in Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.