The Massachusetts-based Kingsley Flood, founded by frontman Naseem Khuri, first made a splash in 2010 with its debut album “Dust Windows,” a rollicking, literate collection of Americana-style tracks that got the group more than its share of local notice.

About Kingsley Flood


The Massachusetts-based Kingsley Flood, founded by frontman Naseem Khuri, first made a splash in 2010 with its debut album “Dust Windows,” a rollicking, literate collection of Americana-style tracks that got the group more than its share of local notice.


The band won New Artist of the Year at the 2010 Boston Music Awards, and it also won Best Roots Act in the 2010 and 2011 Boston Phoenix Best Music Poll. It’s also been featured on NPR’s Weekend Edition and Song of the Day, where “I Don’t Wanna Go Home,” the early single off the group’s new EP “Colder Still,” was spotlighted last spring.


The group plays often in its home base of Gloucester, Mass., but don’t be surprised if they are soon hitting bigger venues — chances to say you “saw them when” may be dwindling.


About ‘Colder Still’


Released last week, “Colder Still” stays true to the group’s Americana roots while taking a more electric, indie-rock approach — and the combination suits them well.


On tracks like “I Don’t Wanna Go Home” and “Mannequin Man,” George Hall’s guitar sounds like a force that’s been waiting to be unleashed, and there’s an attention to melody that has almost a Mersey beat feel, while still seeming raucous and modern. You can hear hints of recent U.K. acts like the Fratellis and the Arctic Monkeys, but with a decidedly American texture.


Not that the group strays too far from its roots, literally — acoustic guitars, banjos and fiddles still play front-and-center roles on songs like “Quiet Quiet Ground” and “Wonderland.” As for the lyrics, they’re keenly tuned in to the way we live now, as exemplified by the moody album closer “House On The Hill,” an almost Springsteenesque indictment of the American dream deferred.


Did you know?




“Dust Windows” was No. 1 on the Amazon.com roots-rock chart for several weeks.

“Colder Still” managed to make the Best of 2011 lists of popular music blogs Twangville, Visible Voice and Ryan’s Smashing Life, even though it wasn’t released until 2012.