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The Suburbanite
  • Charita Goshay: Let’s grow up, let go and carry on

  • The sun rose today, which means the world did not end, nor will it because of the election results. Life insists on forging ahead, oblivious to how we might feel about it.

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  • Because of Tuesday’s early deadline, I’m writing this with no idea of who has been elected president of the United States.
    But here’s what I do know: The sun rose today, which means the world did not end, nor will it because of the election results. Life insists on forging ahead, oblivious to how we might feel about it.
    I also know that no measure of anger, hysteria, denunciation and name-calling will change the outcome of Tuesday’s vote.
    In recent years, some people have nearly lost their minds, forgetting that every president’s power is limited and temporary, forgetting that it’s simply another page of a story that will outlast all of us.
    Forgetting that if we could survive King George, the Civil War, Pearl Harbor, Sept. 11 and yes, even Sandy, we likely will endure this latest chapter.
    I know that if we don’t find a cure for our endless knife-fighting, it will hobble us, even as the rest of the world trudges forward. Casting aspersions on others’ religion, patriotism and loyalty saps our national will and presents the world with a bewildering portrait of a people who claim their country is indivisible.
    I know that we all should want our presidents to succeed. What rational person roots for his or her country’s leadership to languish and fail?
    THE CENTRAL IDEA
    We should, at the very least, aspire to embrace the kind of citizenship found in one of this nation’s greatest sons.
    In the aftermath of one of the most consequential presidential elections in American history — the contest of 1856, in which Democrat James Buchanan prevailed — Abraham Lincoln, speaking at a post-election Republican banquet, observed:
    “Our government rest(s) in public opinion. Whoever can charge public opinion, can change the government, practically just so much. Public opinion, on any subject, always has a ‘central idea’ from which all its minor thoughts radiate. That ‘central idea’ in our political public opinion at the beginning was, and until recently has continued to be, ‘the equality of men.’
    “... Can we not come together for the future? Let every one who really believes, and is resolved, that free society is not, and shall not be, a failure, and who can conscientiously declare that in the past contest he has only done what he thought best — let every such one have charity to believe that every other one can say as much.
    “Thus let bygones be bygones. Let past differences, as nothing be; and with steady eye on the real issue, let us reinaugurate the good old ‘central idea’ of the Republic. We can do it. The human heart is with us — God is with us. ...”
    Few of us possess such eloquence and depth of thought, but surely the essentials of Lincoln’s words are as true now as they were then.
    Page 2 of 2 - Mercifully, the election of 2012 is over. Let’s grow up, let go and carry on with the business of being America.