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The Suburbanite
  • A letter from Green Historical Society President Summers

  • Often when I ask some residents in the community about supporting the Historical Society their response is “I’m not interested in history.”  Admittedly, I have to respond that I wasn’t either, and while in school it was one of my worst subjects.

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  • Dear City of Green Resident:
    Often when I ask some residents in the community about supporting the Historical Society their response is “I’m not interested in history.”  Admittedly, I have to respond that I wasn’t either, and while in school it was one of my worst subjects. My husband, Jim, would tell me while building the house he would find arrowheads and I would think that’s nice and just go on.  When told about the stagecoach route that ran through the property that was Bob’s Lake, I thought. Wow! Neat! But never gave it a second thought. Like many I took it for granted. But was I wrong. Right under my feet and at my fingertips is an amazing amount of history within our community.
    Perhaps my interest peaked because it is a part of the community in which I live and is close to me, not across the seas or in another part of the world. 
    As I write this I am sitting at one of the desks at the Litchenwalter Schoolhouse built in 1885 where we held our last meeting.  I can daydream about what school was like for those students, how they kept warm by the stove in the middle of the room.  I picture the teacher, often a teenager, how she would have to teach grades one through eight; sometimes the students being older than she was.  I picture older students helping one another while the schoolteacher taught the younger grades. I can only imagine what the walk to school was like in the winter or for those that lived a distance away, the cold wagon ride.  All while the schoolmarm was already there shoveling paths to the coal-wood shed and the outside toilet preparing for the arrival of her students.  I realize I am touching history, sitting in history.  Not just mine, but yours and mine. 
    How many of us know how rich our soil is in coal, of the many mine shafts that were dug, and that some of our residents are still required to carry mining insurance on their homeowners policies?  History tells us those shafts were dug around 1891.
    Historical documents that I have read state that sections of Greensburg and Massillon Roads were once a stagecoach route.  How I wish I could walk those dirt roads.
    Yes, history was not a favorite, but since I have come to realize and appreciate how much is in my own community, and have since developed a passion.
    In the past approximately ninety days the Historical Society has been working on a web site, met with the curriculum director, teachers, librarian, assistant principal to involve the students in the history of our community.  The art students are working on designing a float for the Memorial Day parade, and history students are collecting and gathering research.  We are involving the younger community. Students from Green High School will be guest speakers at our May meeting.
    Page 2 of 2 - This is just the beginning of what can be accomplished to help educate and preserve our community.  Currently there are five one room school houses standing but only one is a Historical Landmark so far.  We hope the owners will unite and save these precious buildings.
    One of my main focuses this year is to build membership, both business and individual.  I want to welcome new members to the society and a special thank you for the support of our newest business community members, Emerald Machinery Corp, Farmers Insurance, Greensburg Park Self Storage, Marks Auto Center, Stiles Barber Shop, US Bank and Walnut Woods School.
    Please join us at our meeting the third Thursday of every month.  Meetings are held at John Torok Senior Center at 7p.m. unless posted. 
    Renee’ Summers
    President

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