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The Suburbanite
  • Curfews, ATVs, noise: Parents, you are responsible

  • “Kids think it is great to find a ballfield or someplace to race around and have a good time on their ATVs but it tears up the property and ultimately parents are responsible for any damage done,” said Springfield Police John Smith.

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  • Did you buy Ryan or Rachael that ATV (all terrain vehicle also known as an APV) for Christmas? They were begging for it for months and you just could not resist? It is spring now and they cannot wait to get outside and enjoy their Christmas present but, there are rules that go along with it and you may or may not know…what they are doing while on the vehicle, you are responsible for them.
    “Kids think it is great to find a ballfield or someplace to race around and have a good time on their ATVs but it tears up the property and ultimately parents are responsible for any damage done,” said Springfield Police John Smith.
    Driving on a baseball field in an off road vehicle can result in thousands of dollars in damages.
    “They can be very dangerous,” said Lakemore Police Chief Ken Ray. “We had a fatality last year.”
    The local law enforcement agencies suggests parents lay down the law at home. Let the kids have fun but, know what is fun and what is potential trouble.
    Another issue that can become confusing to parents is the curfew for minors.
    Springfield and Lakemore curfews follow the Summit County guidelines. Anyone under the age of 18 is not allowed out from 11 p.m. until 5 a.m. everyday. Lakemore is working to institute a daytime curfew Ray stated. Kids will not be allowed on the streets during school hours.
    If an underage child is in a car with an adult driver (example: your 16 year old with a 19 year old) not only can the minor be arrested but also the adult. Ray said this is something that is usually done if there is trouble, not if kids are just coming back from a movie or bowling.
    If your child is found in violation of the curfew, they can be subject to penalties. They possibly could serve community service work on weekends or stiffer curfews or house arrest.
    There is a reason that television station always asks, “It is 11 o’ clock, do you know where your children are?”
    “Remember that there are also noise ordinances that play into the rules and regulations,” said Smith.
    If a child is driving around the backyard on their vehicle for four hours a day, around and around and around and it is driving a parent crazy, it probably is getting on the neighbors nerves also. That falls under the noise ordinances in your community.
    For more information and questions call your local police or sheriff department or visit www.co.summit.oh.us, click on Juvenille court and you will find information about curfews and http://www.bmv.ohio.gov for information on APV’s and other vehicles.
    Page 2 of 2 - Rules of the road
    Chapter 4519 of the Ohio Revised Code tells it all when it comes to snowmobiles, off road motorcycles and all purpose vehicles including APV’s.
    • These vehicles must be registered every three years.
    • Only a person who holds a current valid motor vehicle operator license, commercial driver license, probationary license or a motorcycle endorsement may operate a snowmobile, off-highway motorcycle or APV on any street or highway or any portion of the highway.
    • Those less than 16 years of age may operate the vehicles on private property owned or leased to their parents or guardian.
    • If accompanied by an adult, licensed motor vehicle operator (18 and over) riders can be on other land.
    • The law permits the Department of Natural Resources to allow minors between the ages of 12 and sixteen 16 to operate snowmobiles and APV's without a license on state controlled land under its jurisdiction if accompanied by a parent or guardian who is a licensed motor vehicle operator, 18 years of age or older.