Hello, Mr. Zyla! I read with interest your article about the 1960 Ford Starliner. You opined that the rear mimics a bit the 1959 Chevy that had those wild rear fins that resemble birds or airplanes.

Q: Hello, Mr. Zyla! I read with interest your article about the 1960 Ford Starliner. You opined that the rear mimics a bit the 1959 Chevy that had those wild rear fins that resemble birds or airplanes.


The dynamics were probably for airflow and to make the car go faster and help save wear and tear on the motor. These were real “spiffy” vehicles in my day, to say the least.


Because I am an older woman, I’m not that interested in the wheelbase or engine, but it sure was an interesting article and brought back memories of how proud my brother was to own a 1960 Ford Starliner. As for me, I had one Ford, a Pontiac, a Chrysler, two Cadillacs and many Chevrolets during my driving career. I now own a Chevy Impala. Thanks for the memories. Glenna Bruno, a happy reader.


A: Glenna, thanks much for your nice letter, and I didn’t keep the envelope so I can’t nail down where you live. However, I know it is in the area of one of the hundreds of GateHouse newspapers around the country. As for those memories, I have a column in the works that deals with the fins of the 1950s and 1960s, as many readers inquire how fins influenced car design. Cadillac is the car that started the fin frenzy in 1949 with just a “little tip” on top of the fender. Keep watching and you’ll see my column on those wild, some nice … some not so nice, fin designs in an upcoming issue.


Edsel undervalued?


Q: Hi Greg, I see you own a 1959 Edsel and am wondering if you feel these cars are undervalued as I see many for sale for way less than $10,000 in pretty nice shape. Thanks, Bill H., New Hampshire.


A: Bill, I do feel the Edsels are undervalued, and that’s one of the reason’s I purchased one for way less than $10,000 also. Right now, the current book value, which is always suspect to interpretation, lists the value of my Edsel Ranger two-door at about $5,000, and I have insurance for $7,000. However, right now is a great time to find some real bargains out there, and you can buy a nice Edsel for less than $5,000 if you get serious with your searches and have someone check out the car before you buy and have it shipped.


I’ve said many times an owner of a nice collector car usually feels it is worth way more than what a buyer will pay because of the book value. The book value includes estimates for pristine and fully restored Mecum Auction type vehicles, which is not the norm when it comes to all the collector cars out there. Most are in fair to good shape, not pristine.


In ending, I also feel Corvair, AMC, Rambler and Studebaker cars are undervalued, but time will tell if I am right.


Greg Zyla writes weekly for GateHouse Media and welcomes reader questions and comments at 303 Roosevelt St., Sayre, PA 18840 or email him at greg@gregzyla.com.