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The Suburbanite
  • Postcard from ... Limaville: Residents come together at Limaville Post Office

  • Liz Sazdova, who has been postmaster at the Limaville Post Office for 26 years, not only recognizes her customers by their names and faces, but knows almost everything about their lives.

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  • “Welcome home,” said Liz Sazdova, keeper of the stamps in the tiny village of Limaville, the northernmost community in Stark County.
    “How was the trip?” she asked, as a man approached her counter at the village post office with his daughter.
    Sazdova, who has been postmaster at the Limaville Post Office for 26 years, not only recognizes her customers by their names and faces, but knows almost everything about their lives.
    She looked down with a smile at the young girl.
    “Hi beautiful lady, you look nice,” she told the girl, before turning her attention back to the father. “She’s so precious. I just love your daughter.”
    Packages were mailed. Salutations were offered. Just another engaging transaction at what may be one of the most friendly post offices in America.
    Certainly it is one of the U.S. Postal Service’s smallest facilities — a trailer sitting on the corner of Main Street and Atwater Avenue NE. “United States Postal Service” is visible on the front of the structure, and the familiar red-white-and-blue striping further identifies the trailer as a place where the business of the day is mail.
    The modest facility seems to fit and reflect the village of about 150 on the northern edge of Lexington Township.
    “It’s a quiet community,” said Jerry Potts, who has lived in Limaville for more than a decade. “Everybody knows each other, watches over each other’s houses. If I run into someone I haven’t seen for awhile, I’ll stand here and talk to them.”
    Potts comes to the post office every day, said Sazdova, except Sundays and holidays.
    But, then, so does almost everyone else in Limaville. It’s where the mail is. There is no mail delivery in the village. Residents have boxes in the post office.
    “People like it that way,” said Sazdova, listing safety and socializing as common reasons. “I have people in Alliance who have a P.O. box here.”
    A steady stream of postal patrons visited the small facility Wednesday, checking for mail, sending letters, dropping off packages, buying stamps, and often standing to chat a few minutes after their chore was completed. The trailer’s small rectangular lobby seemed to be the favorite porch for everyone in the neighborhood.
    “I’d rather do this. It’s tradition,” said Ron Carlile of making the trip to the post office daily.
    Carlie’s mother, Virginia Carlile, was previously the postmaster, before she handed the keys over to Sazdova more than two decades ago.
    The post office in Limaville has a history that extends farther back in time than the period it has been located in the trailer, of course.
    “At one time it was in my house,” said Carlile. “It’s been in multiple homes in town.”
    Page 2 of 2 - The post office that most people in Limaville know, however, is this small trailer with the flag out front. Village residents — and those drawn to it from outside of the community — park in the adjacent gravel lot and either ascend a ramp or a set of steps.
    “Liz is who makes it welcoming,” said Joyce Austin, who has lived in Limaville for 50 years. “She’s got something nice to say to everybody.”

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