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The Suburbanite
  • Food for Thought: Watch out for hidden sugar

  • Warm weather offers many sweet delights, from trips to the beach and more free time, to seasonal foods and soirees with family and friends. Unfortunately, many of the foods we commonly associate with spring and summer are high in added sugars. Hidden sugar in summer foods can make it a challenge to regulate calories and stay on track with your health goals.

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  • Warm weather offers many sweet delights, from trips to the beach and more free time, to seasonal foods and soirees with family and friends. Unfortunately, many of the foods we commonly associate with spring and summer are high in added sugars. Hidden sugar in summer foods can make it a challenge to regulate calories and stay on track with your health goals.
    “Too much added sugar can have a host of health consequences, such as weight gain, which can in turn increase your risk of developing type 2 diabetes and heart disease,” says Lisa Drayer, a registered dietitian, author of “The Beauty Diet” and spokesperson for Nectresse Natural No Calorie Sweetener.
    If you’re looking for ways to reduce your sugar intake this spring and summer, Drayer offers some tips:
    1. Trim liquid calories by minimizing your consumption calorie-packed beverages like soda. If you must drink soda, opt for diet soda that contains no sugar. Better yet, switch to plain water or other sugar-free beverages with added health benefits, such as black tea. You can drink black tea hot or cold as a substitute for coffee.
    2. Read nutrition labels on everything, not just the foods you assume will be high in sugar. For example, you may be aware that regular soda is high in sugar, but did you know that some salad dressings and barbecue sauces can be, too?
    3. Don’t skip meals or snacks, and don’t take an all-or-nothing approach to sugar. “Completely cutting added sugar out of your diet probably isn’t practical,” Drayer says. Making yourself feel hungry and deprived can lead to unhealthy bingeing. It’s far better to control the amount of added sugar you consume so that it stays at a moderate level, rather than cause yourself to crave sugar and possibly overindulge.
    – Brandpoint