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The Suburbanite
  • New Franklin passes new health code

  • City Council passed legislation Sept. 4 that revised the zoning code to allow the city power to take action on those in violation of the Summit County health code. The resolution, 600.03, was sponsored by Mayor Al Bollas and unanimously passed.

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  • City Council passed legislation Sept. 4 that revised the zoning code to allow the city power to take action on those in violation of the Summit County health code. The resolution, 600.03, was sponsored by Mayor Al Bollas and unanimously passed.
    It will become effective immediately.
    “It’s not to further punish, but it allows [the city] to pursue property owners who are in violation of Summit Country health code,” City Law Director Thomas Musarra said.
    With the legislation in place, the city hopes to deal more quickly with buildings found to be in violation.
    Council also debated additional zoning topics including another zoning law that would limit supplemental land use. New Franklin’s Zoning code section 800.01 would require citizens who wish to build a structure with larger than four feet-by-four  feet to seek approval from the zoning commission. Focused on houses on the lake, the purpose of the legislation is to prevent sightline interference and keep the area aesthetically pleasing.
    Musarra noted that the proposed legislation comes after a court case in which a judge ruled that the current zoning code does not make clear whether structures are included in the limitations.
    Neither of the discussions led to any new resolutions, as wording issues prevented the zoning legislation to be on voted on.
    Council also discussed how to pay the rising cost of lawn services which eclipsed the $8,000 budget for the season. The cost is due directly to the abnormal summer weather.
    Council tabled discussions on all the above matters.
    HEALTH CARE
    A committee hearing addressed health care for city workers.
    Rebecca Randles, managing partner with Strategic Benefits Partners, reported that the city has received an offer from a different company that would cut costs by 5 percent, while the incumbent insurer asked to raise costs by 3 percent.
    Randles made clear that negotiations are not final, but assumed that the city would have to make the move if costs with either company do not change. By making the move, the cost to the city would be the same as it was in 2009.  
    MAIL ISSUES
    During the hearing, resident Barb Steiner asked council to put pressure on the postal service to figure out a solution to a mailing issue. Because of the name changes that the city has undergone in the previous year, receiving mail has become a problem, according to Steiner. Though Steiner was happy to report that emergency responders would be able to locate her house if called upon, her and her neighbors have had trouble receiving mail.
    She said that she could “flood the room” with angry residents about the issue.