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The Suburbanite
  • Hartville Council drives cost-cutting discussion

  • In an effort to cut costs, Hartville Council is considering an ordinance that would eliminate the use of village-owned vehicles for travel to and from work.

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  • Village Police Chief Larry Dordea and Street Commissioner Nate Miller may have to find new rides to work.
    In an effort to cut costs, Hartville Council is considering an ordinance that would eliminate the use of village-owned vehicles for travel to and from work.
    Mayor Richard Currie is against the proposal.
    At the July 2 Hartville Village Council meeting, Currie shared that Ohio municipalities of similar population and size to Hartville pay higher salaries for to their police chiefs and street commissioners.
    “I think this is a slap in the face to those individuals,” Currie said of removing the option of driving city vehicles to and from work. “I really think you should consider whether you want to take that small privilege of driving a Village vehicle to and from work.”  
    Currie said driving village-owned vehicles to and from work is “small perk” for often thankless jobs.
    “Nate Miller and Larry Dordea  are on call 24 hours a day, 365 days a year,” Currie said. “So we ask them at any time of the day or night – any time of the year – to get up from the comfort of their home and come to the village if there is an emergency.”
    Council heard the first reading of the ordinance July 2; It will vote on the ordinance at the next council meeting.
    TAX CREDIT TALK
    The issue of reinstating a 1 percent tax credit to residents living in but working outside the village was discussed. In January, Hartville eliminated this tax credit.
    Currie intends to discuss the tax credit issue at every meeting until November.
    “I don’t think the effort is in the village’s best interest,” Currie said of reinstating the tax credit. “It will have negative consequences on Hartville.”
    A petition to have the tax credit issue placed on the November ballot was initiated by resident and former Mayor Beverly Green. Green told council June 4 that she needed 102 signatures for the petition to be validated by the Stark County Board of Elections.
    In other business July 2, Council:
    n Passed an ordinance that will allow residents to have up to six chickens in areas deemed non-agricultural. The ordinance requires an enclosed chicken coup of eighteen square feet to house the chickens. The coup is required to be at least 50 feet from residents, and 20 feet away from property lines and a resident would be required to pay a permit fee for the chicken coup.
    n Approved the hiring of  Bill Eikelberry for the Street Department. He will start July 8 replace Mike Ringer who is retiring the end of July.
    Council will meet at 7 p.m. July 16 at Village Hall.