|
|
The Suburbanite
  • What's Going On: Holy Cross road reopens after flooding

  • Record-breaking rainfall in 2011 led to a washed-out road at Holy Cross Cemetery in Coventry Township. The road was closed and created a longer walk for those wishing to visit a family member’s grave in that section.

    • email print
  • Record-breaking rainfall in 2011 led to a washed-out road at Holy Cross Cemetery in Coventry Township. The road was closed and created a longer walk for those wishing to visit a family member’s grave in that section.
    Former Akron Service Director Rick Merolla said the source of the problem leads to Brewster Creek, which runs through the cemetery before eventually emptying into the Tuscarawas River.
    “Sewers in that area are designed for a slow, steady rain such as what we experienced with Hurricane Sandy,” Merolla said. “When we see 1,000-year floods and record-setting volumes of rain is when problems arise.”  
    The road was removed and grass was planted over the empty space. It remained this way for several months until recently, when the cemetery created a new road to run through the area and made several improvements to help control floodwaters.
    Merolla said Akron continues to apply for funding to help with the flooding problems in that area, which have been occurring for many years along Waterloo Road and South Main Street.
    Holy Cross Cemetery is owned and operated by the Catholic Diocese of Cleveland.
    Green works on repair pilot program
    The city of Green continues to look for ways to make the ride through the city a little smoother. The city recently repaired a small section of joints along Boettler Oaks Drive as part of a test patch for concrete road maintenance. Work was completed by P.S. Construction Fabrics of Wadsworth with Municipal Services Group as the project manager. On concrete roads, the joints move over time, and changes in weather conditions cause sections of the joints to break away. This results in roads filled with ruts and potholes.
    In the past, the city has repaired these spots with a spray asphalt emulsion and aggregate mix called a DuraPatch, which is an effective short-term repair. The new pilot program is testing two products now on the market that are concrete-based patching materials. These products used are Sikaquick 1000 and Ceratech Pavemend 15.0.    
    “Instead of repairing all the concrete joints in the business park, we opted to do only 500 lineal feet of joints to test the cost effectiveness of the products and the speed of the process,” said Paul Oberdorfer, deputy service director. “This test program will help us determine which products and processes to use in the future for our concrete roadway repair programs.”
    Total cost of the pilot program was about $21,000. Municipal Services Group will monitor and evaluate the roadway over the next year as part of its pavement inventory evaluation project for the city. The group was awarded a contract to evaluate all the roads in Green and recommend a maintenance plan.

        calendar