|
|
The Suburbanite
  • Coventry woman charged in 2 heroin-related deaths

  • Danielle Hoover, 29, of Coventry Township has been charged with two counts of involuntary manslaughter and two counts of tampering with evidence and corrupting another with drugs.

    • email print
  • A woman involved in a three-year Summit County Sheriff’s Department investigation was arrested by Summit County sheriff’s deputies Jan. 30.
    Danielle Hoover, 29, of Coventry Township was charged with two counts of involuntary manslaughter and two counts of tampering with evidence and corrupting another with drugs.
    The charges stem from incidents in September 2009 and December 2012, said inspector Bill Holland.
    In September 2009, Richard Davis was found dead in his Coventry Township home. The Summit County Medical Examiner's report listed the cause of death as a heroin overdose. The sheriff's department investigation into the death determined that Hoover was with Davis “prior to or during the death of Richard Davis,” department reports stated.
    While evidence needed for an arrest was not found at that time, the investigation remained open and Hoover remained a person of interest in the case, Holland said.
    “Detectives looked into it but found insufficient evidence to make an arrest,” Holland said. “If someone dies in one of our police jurisdictions, we work with the medical examiner.”
    Then, on Dec. 25, 2012, Roland Harmon was found dead at Steve's Motel, 1787 Thorn Drive in Green. The medical examiner determined the cause of death as a heroin overdose, and the sheriff's department investigation found that Hoover was with Harmon prior to or during his death.
    “In this case, there was evidence that showed similarities between the two incidents,” Holland said.  
    A press release from the sheriff's department said those similarities were related to the “manner of death, the source of the narcotics, and the presence of Danielle Hoover during and after the incidents.”
    Holland said the involuntary manslaughter charges are first-degree felonies, and the “corrupting another with drugs” charges are second-degree felonies.  According to the Ohio Revised Code, the corrupting charge relates to “knowingly, by force, threat or deception administer to another or induce a controlled substance.”
    “...Say you are with someone and they say 'Let's do some heroin' and you think you are getting a certain dose, but they give you another dose,” Holland explained, noting that the “knowingly” condition is key. “These cases are not accidents — someone giving someone a hot dose and not knowing ...”
    Holland said the Hoover investigation is still ongoing, but additional charges could be pending. The date of Hoover's initial court appearance has not yet been scheduled by the Summit County Court of Common Pleas.