In an illustrating career that’s spanned over three decades, Stoughton’s Larry Johnson has made a name for himself as one of the nation’s wittiest sports cartoonists.

In an illustrating career that’s spanned over three decades, Stoughton’s Larry Johnson has made a name for himself as one of the nation’s wittiest sports cartoonists.


Now Johnson’s entire career as a cartoonist is being celebrated with the recent release of his book, “Out of My Mind,” which features the work of the artist in addition to essays from national sports writers.


“You could almost say I started working on the book 30 years ago, since the book contains some work covering my career as a sports cartoonist from the Globe, the National Sports Daily, ESPN.com to WEEI.com,” said Johnson. “It’s something I always wanted to do and when my friend — Herb Silberstein, V.P. of Touchmark Inc. in Boston — suggested the idea, I jumped at the opportunity.”


“Out of My Mind” is Johnson’s second book of illustrations, but the first one to look back at his career. Previously, Johnson published a book called “Honey I’m Home,” which looked at all things negative about the Red Sox before they won the World Series.


Johnson’s newest book is broken into sections based on the four major sports, in addition to a few miscellaneous topics. He said he enjoyed production of the book.


“The process of putting this book together was very interesting,” said Johnson. “The easiest part was the cartoons, since I have a collection which I add to daily on WEEI.com. My partner, Herb Silberstein, decided to put a dream team together of people with various skills... The cartoons were then edited to the sections the art pertained to... The biggest problem with any sports book is to try and get the info, stats, dates and scores as accurate as possible.”


Though this is the first book of Johnson’s to celebrate his career, the Stoughton resident is no stranger to the publishing world, illustrating over 20 children’s books.


A graduate of the Museum School of Fine Arts, Johnson is also a prolific painter and has even sold a piece of artwork to Oprah Winfrey.


In his new book, one of the unique aspects for Johnson was being able to collect writings from some of the country’s top sportswriters to compliment his illustrations.


As a result of his widespread connections, the essays collected in Johnson’s book read like a who’s-who list of sports journalism.


“Because the book is broken into sections, it worked well because I could get Sports Illustrated’s Peter King to write an essay on the Patriots and Giants Super Bowl,” said Johnson.


In addition to earlier cartoons of his, more recent topical illustrations appear in Johnson’s book, as he noted that he tried to cover as many bases as he could in his book.


“Most books go into production months before they are finally released,” said Johnson.


“What is very special about this book is I wanted to wait until the last minute to publish so I could include cartoons on the World Series — though if I had known the Yankees were going to win, I probably would have thought differently. It even has a cartoon on the controversial Patriots and Indianapolis fourth-and-two play.


When he is not illustrating, Johnson can be heard on WEEI’s weekend program “Mustard and Johnson.”


In addition to his art and radio work, Johnson is also an active member of his local church, spending 25 years as a youth minister at Mount Moriah Baptist Church. Though he is no longer a youth minister, Johnson is looking to get involved again.


“I am seeking the right opportunity to form a young adult ministry,” said Johnson. “I love teaching doctrine and the process by which good decisions by this generation should be made. I have yet to find a place where this ministry can take place.”


Brockton Enterprise