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The Suburbanite
  • Postcard from Massillon: US flag returned to ‘place of honor’

  • The significance of the large American flag now flying atop the Chase Bank building in downtown Massillon is not that it is the city’s solitary banner.

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  • The significance of the large American flag now flying atop the Chase Bank building in downtown Massillon is not that it is the city’s solitary banner.
    Another large flag flies across the street in front of First Merit Bank. Farther east on Lincoln Way a flag flaps in the wind beside the building housing Shearer’s corporate offices and an official city flag is found near the Massillon Government & Justice Center. Numerous red-white-and-blue flags have been raised on poles in the area of the adjacent Veterans Memorial Park.
    Plenty of patriotism is exhibited in Massillon.
    The presence of this flag at the peak of the city’s second “skyscraper” — that status is revealed in the historical plaque on the front of the building — renews patriotism of the past. Stars and stripes flew on this structure decades ago, and now, after a long absence, a flag has returned to a spot that people in the city call “a place of honor.”
    “This successful ad hoc collaboration to fly the flag again is a testament to the way our community comes together,” said Margy Vogt, who suggested to Mayor Kathy Catazaro-Perry that the flag be revived last year.
    Flying beneath the American flag, just as it did decades ago, is an orange flag celebrating the city’s beloved high school football team. “Massillon, Ohio,” words on the banner say, “Home of the Tigers.”
    Officially, the name of the building on which the large flags fly is the Lincoln Professional Building, a structure that is on the National Register of Historic Places. The committee that returned the flags to the top of that building was made up of Vogt, Rick Kettler and Vince Pedro.
    But, those three had help from others in Massillon who were interested in having the flag be “the first thing people saw when they drive into Massillon on Lincoln Way from either direction,” as Vogt wrote in a media release.
    Massillon V.F.W. Post 3124 donated two dozen smaller flags to be flown on the downtown flagpole and sold for $100 each at the mayor’s office. Additional flags will be flown and made available. Money raised will be put in a fund to replace the large flag if necessary.
    Similarly, Massillon Tiger Football Booster Club has sold Tiger flags that also have flown over the city to raise money to replace the large Tiger flag when it becomes worn.