|
|
The Suburbanite
  • Postcard from ... Louisville: History on display

  • The history of a city and the community that surrounds it comes to life one weekend each month at the new home of the Louisville-Nimishillen Historical Society.

    • email print
  • The history of a city and the community that surrounds it comes to life one weekend each month — Saturday and Sunday are the next opportunities — at the new home of the Louisville-Nimishillen Historical Society.
    The Society’s two exhibit rooms in the former Louisville post office — now owned by the Louisville Public Library — on E. Main Street are open for viewing from both days of the second weekend of each month.
    History will greet you at the door. Posted on the wall are the names of all former postmasters who managed the building when it served the U.S. Postal Service — from Solomon A. Gorgas in 1837 to Douglas L. Eaton in 2006.
    An old P.O. Box door on a small wooden box is placed just inside the door of the exhibit halls. A visit to the historical society is free but donations are welcomed, said Betty Derry, treasurer of the organization.
    She and her husband, Ron Derry, who is president, along with Mike Carden, who is vice president, have worked diligently to fill the rooms with a variety of artifacts and images that help tell the history of their community. About 125 members have joined the group since it was formed almost three years ago.
    “The Society strives to collect and protect written and published materials, photographs, and any other media, be it audio or video, and other artifacts of historical or cultural value or significance, past and present,” explains the group’s mission statement.
    The historical books of several local authors — Tom Hannon, Ray Heisey, Jay Bruce Barton, Kenneth Smith, and Mark L. Brunner — are displayed. A binder allows easy browsing of a collection of photographs that are protected by plastic coverings and dozens of other images are hung in exhibit rooms.
    A painting displayed, on anonymous temporary loan, was based on an 1867 photograph and shows how E. Main Street looked in the middle of the 1800s.
    “Remembering our Heritage” is on a sign hanging in the museum. And many have recalled that past. Artifacts — from old kitchen implements to hand tools to baby furniture — also have been loaned or donated by community residents, the Derrys said.
    “People have been so gracious in donating things,” said Betty Derry. “Another thing we encourage people to do is bring us pictures and let us copy them.”