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The Suburbanite
  • Veteran of the week: Dale Campbell, U.S. Marine Corps

  • Dale Campbell was drafted into the U.S. Marine Corps in August 1951 during the Korean War. He had just finished his third year at Ashland College. After finishing boot camp at Parris Island, SC, Campbell was sent to Camp Pendelton, in California near San Diego. There he attended communications school.

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  • MILITARY CAREER
    Dale Campbell was drafted into the U.S. Marine Corps in August 1951 during the Korean War. He had just finished his third year at Ashland College. After finishing boot camp at Parris Island, SC, Campbell was sent to Camp Pendelton, in California near San Diego. There he attended communications school.
    He was sent to Korea in February 1952 and assigned to the 1st Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment of the famous 1st Marine Division. His regiment had fought at both the Pusan Perimeter and took part in the Inchon landing earlier in the war.
    "Korea was the coldest and hottest place I have ever been," Campbell remembered. “We used a lot of leftover equipment from World War II. I wore spats over my shoes because we didn't have combat boots. During the day, I worked at battalion-level communications, but at night, we were used as infantry along the front lines.”
    Campbell rotated home in February 1953.
    "We operated up around the Panmunjon area along the front line,” he said. “After I left, the fighting really became intense because of the push to take the high ground. Some units suffered 75 percent casualties. I missed the end of the war (in July 1953)."
    POST-MILITARY CAREER
    Campbell returned to Ashland to complete his degree in teaching in physical education, history and biology. He began teaching at Springfield in 1954. After six years in the classroom, he was a principal in the elementary and high school and a curriculum director before he retired in 1984. He also officiated at sporting events.
    He and his wife have lived in the area since he started at Springfield. They both received their masters degree from Kent State. They have two daughters and six grandchildren.
    Since his retirement, Campbell has been involved in recognizing area veterans. He works on the Uniontown Veterans Memorial where there are more than 400 bricks with veterans’ names on them. He also works on the annual roundtable discussion at the Military Aviation Preservation Society Museum in Green, which spotlights area veterans. His family has a background of serving in the military. Campbell has three uncles who fought in the Civil War and his older brother fought in the Battle of the Bulge during World War II.