Many of you are curious as to what I am doing these days, so I thought I would use today's column to provide you an update.

Lots of you are still calling, texting, emailing and otherwise expressing your support and concern for me, and that is really touching and very much appreciated. In the words of my Aunt Inez in Georgia, "It's even kinda cute."

You’re asking if I will I be back on a radio station, what I am doing on television, where I am speaking, how my family is doing, if I've found another job yet, if we can go to lunch, and if I'm available for hire. Others are reaching out to tell me they enjoyed being on my show.

So, some answers, in order of those questions and comments:

I’m not sure if I want to do more radio;

My business is doing well and I’m doing a lot of television;

The next place I will be publicly speaking will be as co-master of ceremonies for the Hall of Fame Queen’s Pageant on May 4 (and I have been invited to attend the Fox TV town hall in North Canton Tuesday);

I’m blessed to be able to say my family is doing fine;

I’m not necessarily looking for another job;

Sure, we can go to lunch;

It depends on what you want to hire me to do;

And, I enjoyed having you on my show!

I do have to acknowledge, however, that I miss talking to all of you and being invited into your lives and your homes and your cars and your computers and your phones. And I miss exchanging opinions, listening to yours and you listening to mine. Fortunately, today, broadcast radio is not the only way to do any of that, so that will soon be remedied.

I am very busy these days, too. My main priority right now is to complete the documentaries that my company is producing, especially one on retired Congressman Ralph Regula. I have learned so much from spending time with the congressman and his family and doing research. It seems that everyone I ask has something good to say about Ralph. One reason, I have come to realize, is that he has touched so many lives in so many ways, and not just here in what used to be the 16th Congressional District.

I’ve hung on every word as he has spoken about working in a bipartisan way with late Democrat Congressman John Seiberling to develop the Cuyahoga Valley National Park, or current Democratic Minority House Leader Nancy Pelosi on her Presidio Park project in California, or how he taught Congresswoman Mary Rose Oakar how to milk a cow. He's also discussed his support for funding research at the National Institute of Health, and helping to expand the runways at Akron-Canton Airport. And the list goes on.

I have enjoyed talking to his former staff members, who all still address him as Mr. Regula, even though many of us know him simply as Ralph. They all speak of his work with his constituents and his devotion and determination to help anybody who requested it, regardless of party, district, race or gender.

I recall last fall, sitting on the congressman’s porch down on his farm.  As I listened to him casually talk about his relationships with presidents and other important figures, his accomplishments and how much he loves his cows, my mind wandered to what Washington and its players are like today. It's much different today than when Ralph Regula walked the halls of Congress.

In today’s Washington, where alternative facts, obfuscation, name-calling, disrespect, threats, incompetence, outright lies — and maybe treason — are all battling to be the new American political standard, a conversation with Regula can assure you of true reality and remind you of how politics really should be.

If Ralph Regula told you where an armada was located, you could believe him. ‘Nuff said.

So, for those of you who have been wondering and asking, I hope this provides some answers to your questions. I am blessed, and hope to continue to be!

And finally, there is plenty of fodder for future columns here in the Repository. I look forward to commenting on many of these issues  in my own Ponderian way. Local, state and national politics, the state budget, race relations, health care, tax reform, police-community relations — all of these issues (and more) are begging for a discussion.

But once again, I thank you all. My Aunt Inez from Georgia is right, and I remain blessed.

Update complete. For now.