100 Years Ago (1918)

Ralph Stermer, 9, who lived in the 400 block of West Oxford Street with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. R.B. Stermer, had not been seen by them since the morning of Christmas Eve. It was reported that the boy had left for school in a cheerful mood, but that for some misdemeanor offense, Ralph was subjected to a fatherly talk at the office of Superintendent Stanton. He should have returned to his classroom, but he did not and he had not been heard from since.

Members of the Alliance Board of Health and the City Council held a joint meeting as requested by Lt. J.M. Shapiro, a representative of the U.S. Public Health Service, who was asking for help in the government’s nationwide movement to stamp out venereal disease. Citing that 200,000 soldiers had contracted venereal diseases in home communities, the governement was seeking to treat the afflicted, educate the public and provide facilities for treatment by establishing venereal clinics.

The remains of Todor Palcup, 33, who died on Christmas Eve at the Springfield Tuberculosis Hospital, were buried in Alliance. An unusual feature of the funeral, held in the Blume undertaking rooms and the North Freedom Avenue Church, was that every member of the Penna Lines force of employees of which the deceased was a foreman at Garfield attended, however, there were no women or childred attending the services.

The farmers of Washington Township were arranging for a ring fox hunt on New Year’s Day in an effort to exterminate the foxes that had rapidly multiplied over several years and had played havoc with game, henneries and sheep folds, doing great depredation. Closing place for the hunt was to be the Roose farm between Freeburg and Maximo. All skins taken from the foxes were to be sold to the highest bidder and the money received was to be given to the Red Cross.

75 Years Ago (1943)

Funeral services were held for George M. Meiser, 85, who operated a general store in Paris for 60 years and at one time served as postmaster.

50 Years Ago (1968)

Retiring from the First National City Bank of Alliance were Vice President and Trust Officer N. W. Ritzman after 48 years of service and Head Teller Wilfred Gause after 52 years of service. Citing a series of mergers and consolidations that resulted in the First National City Bank of Alliance, Ritzman noted that he workled in four different banks without ever leaving the building where he started his career. Also retiring was Miss Elizabeth Morgan, who had the distinction of working under two presidents, including W.L. Sebrell (1935-66) and Paul E. Zimmerman (1966-1968).