A special presentation was given by Stephen Dyer, education policy fellow, Innovation Ohio, on funding and its impact on public schools in Ohio at the Portage Lakes Career Center (PLCC) board of education meeting.

A special presentation was given by Stephen Dyer, education policy fellow, Innovation Ohio, on funding and its impact on public schools in Ohio at the Portage Lakes Career Center (PLCC) board of education meeting.

Dyer said that four times the Supreme Court has said the way Ohio funds schools is unconstitutional because "one, we don't have a system that makes sense; and two, that we rely too much on property taxes to pay for schools."

During the Oct. 15 meeting, Dyer said there are some things that charter schools do that are starting to bleed into public schools revenue streams.

"There are potential impacts on your bottom line," Dyer said.

Charter Schools are schools that are freed up of most regulations, allowing them more creativity and innovations.

"That is not what has happened in Ohio,” Dyer said. “In Ohio, they are essentially publicly funded, privately run schools."

He said $946 million was spent on charter schools last year. There are about 120,000 kids in Ohio and 7 percent of the kids were receiving 14 percent of the revenue through the charter schools.

"By the next school year,” Dyer said, “the state will fund more than $1 billion to charter schools.”

Charter schools spend twice as much as districts on administration. They do not spend as much in the classrooms as public schools, according to Dyer.

The 2014 Stanford CREDO Study states that students in rural areas and small towns lose almost an entire year of learning if they go into a charter school. Ohio is one of only four states whose overall charter school performance dropped. It was found that 40 percent of Ohio charter schools are in urgent need of improvement.

He recommend everyone visit www.knowyourcharter.com. You can find out a lot of information on your district and charter schools.

"Every district in Ohio is losing money to charter schools,"

To see Dyer's full report, watch it on the cable Channel 15 or digital Channel 97.204.

FINANCIAL FORECAST

In other business, the five-year forecast was approved by board members.

Treasurer Chris Wright spoke about the forecast and said that they can expect about the same amount of aid over the next few years.

"The state aid will be the same,” Wright said. “The piece that changes is open enrollment. It accounts for about 10 percent of our general fund. We can realize gains and losses in that.”

Wright told the board that the PLCC is doing all it can to operate efficiently

"You can rest assure that the superintendent and I are constantly in discussions about the long-term health of the district," Wright said. "What is important about the forecast is, that our revenue trends are flat. Our expenses are going to grow at some point. For the foreseeable future we are in good shape.”

Also on Oct. 15, the board:

- Approved hiring teacher Thomas Hedington and custodian/maintenance John Kridler as substitutes.

- Approved an equipment donation from Akron Brass Co.

- Approved the board policies for the mission of the district and career advising.

The next Portage Lakes Career Center Board of Education meeting will be held at 6 p.m., Nov. 19 at the school.